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Archive for the ‘vacation’ Category

Our first visit to the neurologist was January of 2004.  He examined Ken, talked with me, and then both of us together. His findings were inconclusive and I mentioned that I would like to avoid the “A” word even though there was a high probability Ken’s future was headed in that direction.  The doctor prescribed Aricept advising it might help.

Near summer’s end we decided to take a road trip through the southwest seeing people and places we would doubtfully visit again.  Ken drove having just renewed his driver’s license in June passing the tests with flying colors.  His reflexes were still good and he was an alert and safe driver.

Our trip was wonderful as we managed to see everyone and everything we had on our agenda.  But twice as we drove along some of the older, more scenic highways Ken would say, “I don’t have the slightest idea where we are or where we are going – where am I?”  I told him not to worry.  “We’re on vacation heading west on the old Highway 40 and it’s okay because I’m the navigator and know exactly where we are and where we’re going”  When in doubt, I would give him directions.  Furthermore, I drove through the cities to eliminate any confusion.  He trusted and believed me.

The following year in early spring he was requested to retest at the DMV.  He failed the written test so badly they disallowed any further testing.  Regardless of how well he had done the year before new tests were required following January’s firm diagnosis of Alzheimer’s.  Conclusion: driver’s license revoked.  More and more obvious signs of memory loss and confusion were beginning to appear even though most of the time; he was “so” Ken.

Over Labor Day weekend in 2006 our daughter Deborah and her husband Mark joined us on our property located in the Sierra-Nevada foothills, where we kept our trailer.  They also brought a group of young women from our church to enjoy the splendor of fall’s beginning and some outdoor camping experience.

We had purchased the land in the mid 90s with a country-retirement home in mind.  The site overlooked a valley of greenery and lakes, and in the evening we could sit where the house would be and watch the sun set.  With a septic tank, well, graded site and roads most everything was ready and waiting for the building to begin. The trailer was intended to be a weekend vacation place, a mini home where we could stay during construction, and for family to enjoy when we weren’t there.

We added an attached screened porch, doubling the floor space, and a deck under the trees.  It was our getaway while the county offices insisted on plan revisions, PG&E scheduled us for the 12th of never, and we encountered enough red tape to outfit the local high school’s marching band.  Then, once again, we began to notice the ever-increasing signs of Alzheimer’s.

That Labor Day with Debbie, Mark and the young women was the last weekend we spent in the trailer.  As the sun dipped out of sight and the merriment from the group of girls reminded me of other times and other campouts with own family, twilight brought further confusion to Ken.  After dark he became extremely disoriented.  “Let’s go,” he urged.  “We’re here,” I told him, “we’ll be spending the night right here in our trailer.”  I reminded him of all we had done to make it comfy and cozy, and how our sons Keith and Kenney had enclosed the area with split-rail fencing to keep the cattle away.  Nothing I said sparked a memory.

We unfolded the built-in beds and covered the mattresses with sleeping bags.  “I don’t want to sleep here,” he complained.  I made every effort to assure him that we had spent many nights in the trailer, our home away from home, but he remained unconvinced.  Finally, he accepted the fact that I was going to stay and, unhappily, he climbed into bed.  I could see in his face he was worried and a little frightened with his accommodations saying, “I don’t even know where I am.”  “You’re with me in our trailer,” I told him.

His disorientation had been a night thing.  The next morning he arose finding himself very much at home enjoying the group of young women, the country and our children, but I was certain the previous evening’s experience must have been terrifying – to be lost and not know how to be found.  Time in the country used to be invigorating and restful, but no more.  I guess it wasn’t/isn’t always a good idea to bring such an unfamiliar change to an already confused mind.

Up until recently any confusion about where he was could be easily set aside with a few comforting comments, but as his Alzheimer’s worsens familiar things and places seem to be vanishing before our eyes.  “Where’s the bathroom?” he will ask. “Is this my house? My backyard?  Where am I?” he questions getting out of bed.  I reassure him, “You are home.  This is your bedroom, your backyard.”

Ken’s decline since February has been dramatic which I measure from month to month while others who don’t see him as often are surprised at how quickly he has digressed down from one plateau to another.  Alzheimer’s takes its victims to that place of no return one step at a time.  Even though it’s his journey, I walk beside him, and there are times when even I ask myself, “Where are we on this road that leads him to nothing?”

As unsure and as slow as he is, his health is fairly good; his upper body is especially strong.  Still, with Alzheimer’s there is no way of calculating life expectancy.  Former President Reagan suffered with the disease for 10 years, and according to an Alzheimer’s research letter, people can live with it up to 20 or more years.  Without being maudlin I sometimes think about the “Where” question with application to another venue, “Where are we?” as we drift aimlessly along life’s conveyor belt asking yet an additional question, “What’s next?” For some questions there appears to be no answers.

In the beginning when Ken and I talked of his disease, it was with a lot of trepidation, but he said, “We can get through this together.”  At the time, I agreed with him asking if he would promise me just one thing, “Always believe and trust me.”  Eagerly and with the same true sincerity as his wedding vow he answered, “I promise.”  It was, however, a promise he is no longer capable of keeping.  Sometimes, I will extend my hand asking if I can help.   Usually, he waves me aside wanting no interference from a stranger. But occasionally I am surprised when he reaches out accepting me and my help.  Holding tightly he pulls and pushes himself from a chair, continuing to hold my hand.  Briefly, he is kind and grateful.  For me, in those moments, it’s a promise kept.  My husband believes and trusts me even if it’s only a fragment of time.  If he were to ask, “Where am I?”  I would answer, “With me.”

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