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Posts Tagged ‘injuries’

Like an old and abandoned truck, some seniors feel they are in their rusting years.

“The Golden Years my Aunt Tillie,” said Frances as we talked about these last few rungs on life’s ladder.  “They’re more like the rusting years.”  “Well put,” I had agreed as she was in the midst of recovering from a bad face-on-the-ground fall that knocked her into the next county breaking her jaw which had to be wired shut while it healed. Like a flash of lightning Frances could zap out words faster than Quick-draw McGraw could whip out his trusty six-shooters.  Her comments could be loving, kind, happy, knee-slapping funny, profound, glib, and, at times, a bit stinging. Did the wired jaw stop her conversations or even slow her quick wit?  Never.  As long as her tongue and mind worked in unison the tumbling words slid out between her teeth and lips with never a pause.

We had become good-enough friends that every so often I was allowed to say, “Oh Frances…….” when a remark might be a little too biting, too stinging or sarcastic, but most of the time I laughed.  She was very funny.

Frances was a widow, and had been for more than 15 years and even with Ken’s AD she invited us for dinner, and I, in turn, prepared dinners for her.  Ken had been Cub Master and she was a Den Mother when all of our boys were just boys.  The two hit it off famously and became the best of friends with my utmost approval.  Frances always puckered up and gave Ken a quick peck on the lips whenever they met.  Following their amicable kiss Frances would say, “How! Great White Father,” holding her hand up with an Indian greeting in reference to a long-ago Pack Night theme from a sweet, innocent time when we were all young.  Then one day we were no longer young and she was suddenly gone.  I miss my friend.

I’ve noticed that a lot lately; our friends keep dying, or they move away.  “Get some younger friends,” advised another dear friend Sofia who, with her husband Don, have moved away, but not too far, just inconveniently far.

Making “couple friends” is difficult though when your spouse has a debilitating terminal illness.  So I mostly hang out with women who have lost their husbands.  They are widows and I am sort of a widow, but I’m not.  Nevertheless, there is an inescapable loneliness in being the one left behind no matter what your title.  Unfortunately, that feeling of being alone can never be filled by friends or family, even though the need for friends and family remains paramount to the well being and happiness of the remaining individual.

I thought about this the other day when I visited Eva.  She and her husband were the entertainers from Hawaii who I have mentioned in other writings.  He’s been gone for more years than I remember, and now with her AD and circumstances dictating the remainder of her life she lives in a very nice full-care facility.  Walking through the halls I was aware of so many lonely souls sitting in their wheelchairs outside of their rooms, and I wonder who they are and about those who still share their lives.  Sofia’s husband Don has a phrase that I often think about when I visit people with full dependency on a nursing home:  “A mother can care for seven children, but seven children can’t seem to take care of one mother.”  It’s only a phrase, but following that first capital letter and the ending period, there’s a lot of truth in those few words.

I found Eva in front of her room matching the forlorn description of the others. Tiny little thing sitting there by herself, looking lost, lonely and pitiful, and I couldn’t help but feel a stab of melancholy as she scanned the area – searching – waiting.  “Let’s go for a ride,” I suggested, securing the foot rest, and then wheeling her through an open door.  It was pleasantly warm outside, so that’s where we went.  I parked her chair in the shade with ribbons of filtered sun teasing the shadowed greenery.  “Where……,” she stammered.  “What is it?” I coaxed.  “Where is my family?” she asked looking puzzled about her surroundings.  That’s the trouble with AD; the answer has been given, but the question keeps rising to the surface.  “All of your children except for Matthew live very far away,” I reminded her.  “They come when they can, but I know Matthew is here to see you almost every day.  I’m sure he’ll come later this afternoon.”  I think of Eva remembering how she was:  beautiful and vivacious in her brightly colored and fitted muumuus, and so filled with charm as she strummed her ukulele and sang melodies from the Islands and pop tunes of the day.   Now I feel overwhelmingly sad that the life she knew, her home and all that was familiar are gone.

Rather than making small talk I sing to Eva.  To those who know me really well my singing is a joke, but I’m not making conversation, nor do I, for one minute, think I’m the entertainment du jour.  I’m communicating with her spirit.  This I believe.  Eva relates to music so I softly sing some of her favorite hymns and songs I recall from her entertaining days.  She manages to join in with a few words and she smiles, and for that little while she appears to be content.

At 90 most of her friends are gone, others are not capable of travel, but I do believe there is a self-imposed detachment that happens with some friendships – and even some family members concerning these last years. I know with certainty that many people claim they don’t have the capability of coping with seeing their friend or loved one in a care facility, hospital, or even visiting the infirmed or elderly in their home; “Too depressing.  I just can’t deal with it.  It hurts me too much,” I’ve heard people say.  I understand because my father was that way.  Yet, I want to scold and remind them, “This isn’t about you.  It’s about Eva, Uncle John, Rose, grandpa, your sister, brother, your father, or Frances’ Aunt Tillie.” You need to strive to bring some joy and a little companionship into that person’s life.  Forget about yourself.  It’s called love and compassionate service, and the more you participate in reaching out to others, the more you grow as a person.  Pretty soon, you’ll even catch the spirit and you’ll be surprised at how good you will feel when bringing some brightness into another’s life.  I could say all this, but I won’t.  It isn’t my place, but if Frances were here, she would.  She might also tell them a few funny stories about the rusting years.

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I can’t imagine what it must have been like to receive the kind of phone call my children received the night our car was hit by a drunk driver; when life, as we all knew it, suddenly came to a screeching halt leaving dinners uneaten, appointments canceled, meetings unattended, young children bewildered and our adult children and their spouses gathered in disbelief.  In retrospect I realize how naive humanity really is, all of us thinking we are so in control — masters of our very existence — when in reality we are not.  Life pulls the rug from under our feet every so often, perhaps to remind us of how frail and vulnerable we really are, and how dependent we are on one another.

Now what?  I suppose that was the paramount question.  Suddenly, the responsibility of mom and dad fell upon the shoulders of the next generation with absolutely no warning.  Even with Ken’s Alzheimer’s, he and I are the generational buffer zone between them and the great beyond.  You know, the older generation that keeps those of middle age somewhat “young” because their parents are still alive; grandparents to their children and like a rock we have always been there.

Then, unexpectedly things change and major decisions must be made by five adult children.  Five different opinions need to be considered, and five solutions weighed for the dozens of problems which lay ahead.  Could they work together or would they pull in opposite directions?  Could they get past “personalities” and agree even if it was agreeing to disagree, and be able to get on with the tasks at hand which included health-care decisions based on existing Advance Directives.  Who could and would handle the varying components and who would be accountable for mom and dad’s finances?  What about dad?  What would they do with their dependent father once he was released from the hospital:  caregivers at home or a care facility — or what?

I now refer to Keith as my CEO.  It seems that someone in the family steps forward and takes over.  Not that there isn’t that same capability of leadership in all of our children, it’s just that this time it was Keith who took charge — delegating and assigning what needed to be done.  Whether the others grumbled or disagreed I don’t know, nor do I want to know.  What I do know is that my children — with families of their own, business and work schedules to attend — set aside their own priorities to care for our needs.  Together, perhaps prodded and encouraged by the CEO, they worked like a finely-tuned machine; each doing what was assigned in the best way they knew.

As I recovered, I was able to spend a good amount of time with each one of my adult children: three men and two women, and their families.  It was quality time, relaxed time, alone time, intimate time, and stolen time from their busy lives, but I treasured those hours with them, rediscovering who they were, finding them to be the kind of people Ken and I had hoped they would become.  I also realized how very different they are, which I found rather amazing.  Coming from the same parents they are not carbon copies of me and Ken.  They have, however, grown into their own diverse persons while embracing the same values and qualities they had been taught: they are vigilant and hard working; and they are good, kind, loving and giving people.  I understand they don’t always agree with one another, nor do they always agree with us, and that’s all right.  The important thing is they are there for each other, and they are there for us.  Not only do I love them, but I like them; could a parent ask for anything more?

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