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Posts Tagged ‘stimulate’

It’s a few days after Christmas and I have a terrible cold spending as much time in bed as possible.  Surprisingly, and considering where Ken’s mind is he has been somewhat cooperative, allowing me to remain in bed in an in-and-out sort of way.   It’s a rare time when I feel bad enough to stay in bed, and it feels really good.

Apparently, there is something remembered within Ken’s Alzheimer’s which allows him to be more responsible if he can grasp the situation:  my wife is sick, or that person is sick.  He then appears to rise to the necessity — and is Ken most of the day — well, somewhat Ken.  Too bad I’m not able to run my world, pay the bills, do the shopping, attend to all of Ken’s needs, and all of those other requirements of life from under the blankets.

We are still taking care of Julie and Tim’s dogs, and I’m concerned about Cody, a pretty Border Collie who likes to run away if she can get through an open door.  I suppose she would come back eventually, but not having street smarts a lot of bad things could happen during her stolen adventure.  How to solve that problem with Ken doing his constant patrol checking from the porch and leaving the door wide open as he surveys the neighborhood is a worry.   I have mentioned my concern to him repeatedly, but to no avail.  I remind him that it isn’t just about the dogs: an open door allows the cold air in — or the warm out — whichever it happens to be.  In any event he remembers none of the instructions as he opens wide the door allowing the house temperature to drop flipping on the furnace.

For Ken cold is good and he feels very comfortable when the gage reads 65 degrees.  I am comfortable at 70 degrees — and higher.  To solve the furnace problem, I have finally decided to just wear more clothes which will keep me warm and the furnace off.  This will make Ken very happy.  However it doesn’t help the escaping dog problem.

My first approach was to put our kitchen bench in the dining room barricading the folding doors in a closed position.  (That also helps keep any heat that may have accumulated in the family room in that section of the house.)  I put a big note on the doors advising Ken to use the “other door” adding, “Don’t let the dogs out.”  That seemed to work.

To make it totally secure so I could stay in bed for a while with absolute peace of mind it was prudent to lock the dead bolt, which is keyed both sides, keeping the key in my pocket.  Of course it troubled Ken that he wasn’t able to open the door until I explained Julie had the key, and when she and Tim picked up the dogs she would unlock the front door.  So far, so good.  He’s happy and I’m back in bed.

Lately, Ken is finding it difficult to understand about actually “going to bed.”  I give him Tylenol PM at 8:00 and by 9:00 he is usually tired and sleepy.  I switch on the TV, a nightlight, lay out his pajamas and turn down the bed.  When I come back he is still fully dressed, the pjs are folded neatly and placed under the pillow and the bed is remade.    I don’t understand his thinking, but then I don’t understand AD either.  Last night I went in to see if he was in bed, and found him unhooking all of the electrical stuff:  TV, lamps, taking out light bulbs and removing shades as if it were his chore to do before he could settle in.  It appears that’s where he is heading again tonight which means another midnight to somewhere near morning for the two of us.

I have noticed that the more active he is the more alert he becomes.  Moving around the house — looking into this and that — gets his juices going — stimulates what I am striving to subdue, and when he reaches  a certain stage of anxiety he isn’t about to go sleep.   I would really like to get back to bed and nurse my cold — and I’m sure it will happen — somewhere in the wee, small hours of the morning.  At least the house is warm and the dogs are asleep.

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